Why Are Home Inspections Important?

Home inspector online training. A home inspection is an all-encompassing examination of the condition of a home.   The home inspection process is often but not always performed at the time of the sale of the home. A home is one of the most important purchases one will ever make.  A home inspection is an inexpensive way to discover the universal condition of a home.  It is important to conduct a home inspection to avoid a costly mistake by purchasing a property in need of major repairs.  Even if you think you have found a “dream home,” it is a home inspector’s responsibility to let you know that your “dream home” may not be just right.

Home inspector online training. A certified home inspector is a professional who will conduct an inspection of the general condition of the home.  A good home inspection will assist a buyer in understanding exactly what they are about to acquire.  A home may look move in ready, but an inspector will cover features of the house such as electrical wiring, plumbing, roofing, insulation, as well as structural features of the home and may unveil issues that are not noticeable to the buyer’s eye.  As a buyer, you are making a vast investment, and it is important to understand exactly what you are purchasing.  Having a certified home inspector conduct a thorough inspection of the prospective property, could be compared to taking out an insurance policy against all potential operating costs.

There are many different types of home inspection processes that you may want to conduct before the purchase of a home.  First and most importantly, you would need a general or residential inspection performed on the home.  The certified home inspector would inspect the structure, exterior, roof, electrical, plumbing, HVAC, interior, insulation and ventilation.  Once the inspection is completed, the home inspector will generally provide the buyer with a report suggesting any improvements or repairs deemed necessary to bring the home up to current standards.  Home inspections may often reveal problems with a home that could be pricey to fix.  This could be used as a great tool in purchasing negotiations with the seller.  As the buyer you may be able to negotiate the price dependant on what the inspector has found.  If flaws were found within the home, the buyer now would have a couple more options in negotiations.  A buyer could negotiate a credit with the sellers, have the seller pay for repairs before the closing, purchase the home as is, or walk away from the purchase if the issues seem too problematic.

Another home inspection process a buyer may want to have before the purchase of a home would be a termite/wood destroying organism inspection.  This certified inspector would check for signs of structural damage caused by wood boring insects.  These insects may cause problems down the road.  A general home inspector may perform this inspection for an additional cost, or recommend a WDO/WDI inspector to the buyer.

radon inspection is also important when purchasing a home.  Radon is a radioactive gaseous element formed by breakdown of radium, that occurs naturally especially in areas over granite, and is considered hazardous to health.  Radon gas from natural sources can accumulate in homes, especially in confined areas such as attics and basements.  Radon levels fluctuate naturally, therefore testing for high levels is important. A radon test consists of using a radon kit that would be hung or placed in the lowest habitable floor of the house for two to seven days.  After the kit has sat for the required amount of time, the inspector would then send the kit to a lab for analysis.  If a radon test comes back high, some ways to alleviate the radon could be:  sealing concrete slab floors, basement foundations, and water drainage systems.  This could be a costly fix, suggesting the importance of radon inspections.  Some general home inspectors will also do radon testing at an additional cost. It is important you ask your inspector if he performs these inspections, or for recommendations.

Other inspections that you may want before purchasing a home may be well water testing, oil tank testing and septic tank testing.  General home inspectors may be qualified to perform all of these tests and/or inspections for additional fees. It is important that you ask your potential inspector what his/her qualifications may be.

If at all possible, it is recommended to attend your home inspection process.  This is a valuable educational opportunity. Never pass up the chance to see your forthcoming home through the eyes of an expert.  The cost of a home inspection may vary depending upon the size, region, and age of the house.  A home inspection could take anywhere from 2-5 hours, again, depending upon the size and age of the home.  It is not an inspector’s responsibility to correct, or repair any potential issues found in the home.  An inspector may recommend repair, or to seek out skilled professionals in each trade for further information.

A home inspection will definitely give the buyer peace of mind and put the buyer’s mind at ease that the home is in good shape. It can also become a negotiation tool in closing, and could inform the buyer of potential future maintenance and upkeep.  A seller of a home may also request a home inspection before the home is put on the market.   This may assist the seller in setting a price, correct any issues with the home before it is put on the market, or merely having a pre-inspection report available for buyers informing them that the seller has nothing to hide.

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The AmericanHomeInspector.org is the most complete home inspection course on the market today.  The online course is completely self-paced and works on all computers and devices – including laptops, tablets, and even iphones and android phones.  Students will also get access to our online reference library where we have a huge repository of home inspection related e-books and online reference material covering everything from mold and radon to septic and termites – along with many other topics.

After completing the AmericanHomeInspector.org home inspection training course online you will be able to do any of the following:

  • Start your own successful home inspector business
  • Perform ancillary services such as mold inspections, radon testing, healthy housing inspections, commercial property and building inspections, and HUD inspections
  • Apply for work with your local municipality as a new construction or building code inspector
  • Members get everything from world-class home inspection education

Tuition: $

199/year

 

 

 

Only $149.

 


You’ll also get full access to our online reference library which includes:

  • Mold – over 800 pages of downloadable e-books and online reference material
  • Radon – over 600 pages of downloadable e-books and online reference material
  • Indoor Air Quality – over 200 pages of downloadable e-books and online reference material
  • International Building Codes – over 5,000 pages of downloadable e-books and online reference material
  • Free Logo & marketing design services
  • And over $95,000 worth of additional benefits!
  • Knowledge of Drone for Home Inspection Business

Over 20 additional downloadable e-books covering a variety of home inspection related topics including energy audits, termite inspection, septic inspection, and much more!

* No contract (cancel at any time)

 

10 Reasons You Shouldn't Skip A Home Inspection

After your offer to buy a home enters into contract, the process of near-endless check writing begins. There are many necessary costs, such as realtor and lawyer fees, and the total of these expenses may have you looking for ways to save money elsewhere. You may be tempted to skip the home inspection and its $200 to $500 invoice, but there are 10 good reasons why you should get one.

1. It Provides an “Out”
A quality home inspection can reveal critical information about the condition of a home and its systems. This makes the buyer aware of what costs, repairs and maintenance the home may require immediately, and over time. If a buyer isn't comfortable with the findings of the home inspection, it usually presents one last opportunity to back out of the offer to buy. (This step is important when purchasing a property because it may save you thousands. For more, see Do You Need A Home Inspection?)

2. Safety
A home inspection can detect safety issues like radon, carbon monoxide, and mold, which all homes should be tested for. Make sure that your home-buying contract states that should such hazards be detected, you have the option to cancel the offer to buy.

3. Reveal Illegal Additions or Installations
A home inspection can reveal whether rooms, altered garages or basements were completed without a proper permit, or did not follow code, according to Chantay Bridges of Clear Choice Realty & Associates. “If a house has illegal room additions that are un-permitted, it affects the insurance, taxes, usability and most of all the overall value. In essence, a buyer is purchasing something that legally does not exist,” she explains. Even new homes with systems that were not installed to code will become the new homeowners' financial “problem” to fix (and finance). (The home for sale/purchase must pass inspection.

4. Protection
Home inspections are even more critical if you are buying an “as-is” foreclosed property or short sale. Dwellings that have been boarded often develop hazardous mold problems, which are costly to remedy and pose health concerns. Greg Haskett, VP of shared services at HomeTeam Inspection Service says it's common for home inspectors to find that copper plumbing lines and outdoor compressors have been removed from foreclosed properties by people trying to sell copper to recyclers for money.

5. Negotiating Tool
Realtor Jennifer De Vivo of Orlando-based De Vivo Realty says the home inspection report presents an opportunity to ask for repairs and/or request a price reduction or credit from the seller. Work with your realtor to understand what requests can and should be made to negotiate a better deal.

6. Forecast Future Costs
A home inspector can approximate the installation age of major systems in the home like plumbing, heating and cooling, and critical equipment like water heaters. They can diagnose the current condition of the structure itself, and tell you how long finishes have been in the home. All components in the home have a “shelf-life.” Understanding when they require replacement can help you make important budgeting decisions, and it wll determine what type of home insurance coverage or warranties you should consider.

7. Determine “Deal-Breakers”
De Vivo suggests that home inspections can help buyers identify how much additional money or effort they are willing and able to spend to take the home to a condition that is personally acceptable. If you are unwilling to repair issues like faulty gutters, cracked walls or ceilings, perhaps you are not ready to end your home buying search.

8. Learn to Protect Your Investment
The home inspector is a valuable educational resource. He or she can suggest specific tips on how to maintain the home, and ultimately save you thousands of dollars in the long term, according to De Vivo.

9. Reveal the Big Picture
Haskett advises that people use the home inspection to understand the nuances of what may be the biggest purchase they ever make. “People fall in love with a piece of property based on the color of the walls, the location of the home, or something else; they are completely blind to the issues that can make that dream home a nightmare,” he says.

10. Insurance
Some insurance companies will not insure a home if certain conditions are found, or without the presence of certifications like Wind Mitigation and four-point inspections, according to Haskett. “Qualified home inspectors can do these things at the same time as their other services and save the home buyer time and money in the long run.”